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MAY 31 , 2015 NATIONAL BOOK AUCTION LISTINGS - ITEMS SUBJECT TO CHANGE [FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 607-269-0101] • RETURN TO HOME PAGE

 

Sunday, May 31, 2015

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Lot 3001

$2200

Title: Native Son
Author: Richard Wright - Richard Nathaniel Wright was an African-American author of sometimes controversial novels, short stories, poems, and non-fiction. Much of his literature concerns racial themes, especially those involving the plight of African-Americans during the late 19th to mid-20th centuries. His work helped redefine discussions of race relations in America in the mid-20th century.
Publisher: Harper & Brothers Publishers
City: New York
Year: 1940
Printing Information: Signed Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: xi/359 pages
Width: 6" Height: 8.5"
Book Details: "Native Son" (1940) is a novel by American author Richard Wright. The novel tells the story of 20-year-old Bigger Thomas, a black American youth living in utter poverty in a poor area on Chicago's South Side in the 1930s.

While not apologizing for Bigger's crimes, Wright portrays a systemic inevitability behind them. Bigger's lawyer makes the case that there is no escape from this destiny for his client or any other black American, since they are the necessary product of the society that formed them and told them since birth who exactly they were supposed to be. "No American Negro exists," James Baldwin once wrote, "who does not have his private Bigger Thomas living in his skull." Frantz Fanon discusses this feeling in his 1952 essay "L'experience vécue du noir", or "The Fact of Blackness". "In the end," writes Fanon, "Bigger Thomas acts. To put an end to his tension, he acts, he responds to the world's anticipation." (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)
Condition / Notes: This is a scarce author-signed first edition. The inscription on the front flyleaf reads "To / Leroy Goble / With all good wishes / Richard Wright / 3/11/40 / New York."

This volume is bound in dark blue cloth. The spine and front cover display the title in red lettering within a gray panel and the author's name in black within a red panel. The book shows light shelfwear. The binding is firm. Light foxing is visible on the endpapers. The pages are clean and without markings. The intact dust jacket, with price of $2.50 on the front flap, is lightly soiled and exhibits loss and taping along the bottom and top edges. The spine panel is sunned. The jacket is now preserved in a paper-backed mylar cover.

This book is from the library of Leroy Truman Goble, a minor figure in the Chicago literary renaissance of the 1920's. Goble was friendly with the likes of Sherwood Anderson and Ben Hecht. He was also a photographer and artist, although he seems to have worked in the fledgling advertising in Chicago during that time.
Lot 3002

$475

Title: Is She a Wife? Or, Something Singular. A Comic Burletta in One Act
Author: Charles Dickens - Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English novelist, generally considered the greatest of the Victorian period. Dickens enjoyed a wider popularity and fame than had any previous author during his lifetime, and he remains popular, having been responsible for some of English literature's most iconic novels and characters.

Many of his writings were originally published serially, in monthly installments or parts, a format of publication which Dickens himself helped popularize at that time. Unlike other authors who completed entire novels before serialization, Dickens often created the episodes as they were being serialized. The practice lent his stories a particular rhythm, punctuated by cliffhangers to keep the public looking forward to the next installment. The continuing popularity of his novels and short stories is such that they have never gone out of print.

Dickens' work has been highly praised for its realism, comedy, mastery of prose, unique personalities and concern for social reform by writers such as Leo Tolstoy, George Gissing and G.K. Chesterton; though others, such as Henry James and Virginia Woolf, have criticised it for sentimentality and implausibility.
Publisher: James R. Osgood and Company
City: Boston
Year: 1877
Printing Information: First US Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 80 pages
Width: 3.5" Height: 5"
Book Details: "Charles Dickens and Catherine Hogarth had been married on the 2nd of April, 1836, and had spent a one-week honeymoon at the cottage of a Mrs. Nash, in Chalk, near Gravesend. Dickens was still working as a Parliamentary reporter, and he could only take a short time away from work, while the Houses were in Easter recess.

Ten months later, the couple was to return to the same cottage, this time for an entire month (Feb 1837). Things had changed. Two days before the marriage, the first number of Pickwick Papers had appeared, and in the time intervening, Dickens had quit his day job as a reporter, and had become one of the most popular writers in London. He was so busy, in fact, that when he went on this second honeymoon, he had to take some work along him, finish it off the first night (Sat 4 Feb), and send it back to London by priority mail.

What was this work? The actor J.P. Harley had wanted another play from Dickens, to follow the success of The Strange Gentleman. Dickens wrote Harley: “I have by me a little piece in one act called ‘Cross Purposes’, which I wrote long before I was Boz. It would admit of the introduction of any Music; and if you think there is anything in it, it is at your service.” (Pilgrim 1:226). Dickens had first used the name “Boz” for part two of “The Boarding-House” (Aug 1834), so, if he was being literal, the play was over two years old.

In Pickwick Papers, and in Nicholas Nickleby, several not-too-relevant short stories are dropped into the novels, and it’s sometimes thought that these were older pieces pulled in to help with deadline problems. The case of “Cross Purposes”, presented below as Is She His Wife?, is the only time we know for certain that Dickens pulled such old material “out of the trunk”, and used work from the days before his success, to help meet the sudden demand for his writing. Such a practice would help to explain Dickens’s phenomenal burst of productivity and activity at this time.

The storyline of Is She His Wife? involves a couple, married six months, with the husband restless, snappish, and bored from staying in the country, and both of the pair unhappy. Given the circumstances under which the play was revised, the storyline must, inevitably, raise eyebrows. But the piece is not autobiographical. The bulk of it had been written long before the Dickens marriage, and the revisions made in the honeymoon cottage, done for Harley, must have served to create or modify the role of his character, Felix Tapkins. The piece is too good-natured and frivolous to reflect any marital discord.

Charles and Caroline probably returned from Chalk in time to see the premiere of the short play. Is She His Wife? opened on Monday, March 6th, 1837; by April 25th it was on its nineteenth performance. It appeared on and off through the end of the season (31 May). A thirty-minute farce like this serves mainly as an extra attraction to supplement longer and more substantial dramas; we would not expect it to draw much in the way of crowds or attention. The name of Boz did not appear on the playbills until one week after the farce premiered, and without knowing that Dickens was involved, few papers bothered to review such a short slight piece. The Sunday Times called it “a trifle, but a pleasant one, containing sufficient incident to interest the audience while it lasts”. The Morning Chronicle, Dickens’s old employer, wrote: “The few meagre incidents had not even the merit of novelty to recommend them, and the dialogue was singularly pointless with the exception of a few puns of venerable antiquity….It was well received, but whether the audience of another night will be so indulgent, is doubtful” (both quoted in Dexter). Wife has been revived, as a lunch-time pub production in London (1971), and by the Broadstairs Dickens Players (1975?), the latter winning local awards.

Is She His Wife? is Dickens’s most risqué work. It features such racy material as extra-marital flirting, flippant jokes about adultery, and even a woman displaying her shapely ankle. The Times wrote that: “The plot bordered on the dangerous, but it was so dexterously and delicately managed that its success was decided. We have rarely seen Harley to such advantage” (quoted in Dexter, 254). Like all plays at this time, it was registered with the Lord Chamberlain for licensing, as required by law; but nothing was censored. Similarly, no deletions are indicated in the published copy. The Village Coquettes had undergone “choppings and changings” (Pilgrim 1:246), in its passages about seduction, gambling, and subversion; but Is She His Wife? appears to have escaped unscathed.

In the past, Is She His Wife? has sometimes been of more interest to book collectors than to playgoers. A version of the comedy was published about the time of its production, but only one copy was ever known to exist—perhaps some kind of print test. The single copy was in the possession of James Ripley Osgood, one of Dickens’s American publishers, when it was lost in a fire in Boston (1879). Luckily it had already been reprinted (1872?, 1877); these are among the rarest of Dickens early editions.

We are fortunate that the text of this play has survived. It would have been a shame to lose it. Deliberately loud and hammy, Is She His Wife? is a marvellous opportunity for actors to act daft, overact, and chew up the carpet. It follows the conventions of many theatre farces of the time, and strings together a series of contrived coincidences and implausible misunderstandings. Audiences liked and expected such things. Like all three of the St. James’s Theatre plays, the best part is the “low comic” character—in this case, Felix Tapkins, a good example of one of Dickens’s eternal optimists. To Boz’s new fans, Felix Tapkins in Wife, and Martin Stokes in Coquettes—both played by Harley—would have seemed like the most “Dickensian” characters in those plays.

Just a few annotations should be noted, and then we can let anxious readers proceed to Dickens. “Humane man-traps” are mentioned; these were intended to be just what they sound like; groundskeepers would sometimes set these out to prevent poaching. The Felix Tapkins character makes his entrance singing “A hunting we will go”; this is the second verse of the song from Henry Fielding’s ballad opera, “Don Quixote”; another case of Dickens alluding to two of his favourites, Cervantes and Fielding. Readers can understand the rest by themselves, with some application, so put all distractions aside, turn off your cell phones, and let the curtain rise." (Courtesy of an On-Line Discussion Group about Charles Dickens at http://home.earthlink.net/~bsabatini/Inimitable-Boz/etexts/Is%20She%20His%20Wife.html)
Condition / Notes: This antique volume is bound in dark green cloth with stamped black lettering to the spine and stamped gilt lettering to the front cover. Ornamental designs stamped in black also appear on the front cover. The book shows moderate external wear, with some minor black spotting to the rear cover. The binding is firm. Publisher's advertisements appear on the endpapers. An antique book dealer's sticker can be seen in the upper outside corner of the front pastedown. The pages exhibit scattered light foxing. This work is illustrated with a title page vignette, two woodcuts, decorative initials and head- and tailpieces.
Lot 3003

$175

Title: Dracula
Author: Bram Stoker - Abraham "Bram" Stoker was an Irish author known today for his 1897 Gothic novel, "Dracula." During his lifetime, he was better known as personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.
Publisher: Archibald Constable and Co. Ltd.
City: Westminster, London
Year: 1904
Printing Information: Other - see description
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: vii/390 pages
Width: 5.5" Height: 7.25"
Book Details: Famous for introducing the character of the vampire Count Dracula, the novel tells the story of Dracula's attempt to move from Transylvania to England so he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and the battle between Dracula and a small group of men and women led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel and invasion literature. The novel touches on themes such as the role of women in Victorian culture, sexual conventions, immigration, colonialism, and post-colonialism. Although Stoker did not invent the vampire, he defined its modern form, and the novel has spawned numerous theatrical, film and television interpretations. (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)
Condition / Notes: This is a scarce early appearance of this classic Gothic novel, being the eighth edition of a work which first appeared in 1897.

This volume is bound in red cloth, with stamped black lettering to the spine and front cover. Floral designs stamped in black appear on the front cover. The book is slightly cocked and shows darkened spine and light soiling to the covers. Minor loss of material can be seen at the top/bottom of the spine and at the outside corners of the boards. The binding is firm. The pages are clean and without markings. Press notices appear on the page opposite the title page.
Lot 3004

$70

Details: This lot includes the antique fold-out color map shown in the corresponding image(s).This map, entitled "Collins's Standard Map of London: New Survey," by Henry George Collins, was published by Edward Stanford of London in 1871. This work of cartography is preserved in a volume in pebbled green cloth, with a red pastedown with white lettering to the front cover, contains a 23-page booklet listing the principal places of interest in London and surrounding areas, and an index of "three thousand references to Collins' London." The fold-out map itself, measuring approximately 33.5" x 27", was drawn & engraved by Richard Jarman. A yellow page listing public conveyances appears pasted onto the verso of one of the sections of the map which rests opposite the first page of the guide.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: The volume, measuring approximately 4.25" x 6.5", is well preserved. The map has a small tear at pair of the intersections of the folds. The colors are quite vivid.
Lot 3005

$100

Title: A Handbook for Travellers in Spain
Author: Richard Ford
Publisher: John Murray
City: London
Year: 1869
Printing Information: Other - see description
Binding Style: Hardcover
Number of Volumes: 2 Full Set: Yes
Width: 5" Height: 7.25"
Book Details: Richard Ford’s "A Handbook for Travellers in Spain" (1845) marked a defining moment in English travel literature.

British tourists were travelling through Europe in increasing numbers and the need for guidebooks was beginning to be supplied by publishers like John Murray. In 1845 Ford, who had gained tremendous knowledge of Spain by extensive travel on horseback, wrote this charming account enlivened by humour and anecdotes.

In Ford's obituary, commonly attributed to Sir William Stirling-Maxwell, "so great a literary achievement had never before been performed under so humble a title." Ford marked, with George Borrow the eccentric English traveller, an interest in Spain that would continue through the twentieth century on the part of British writers: Gerald Brenan, Norman Lewis and George Orwell were among the most eminent of these successors, with Jason Webster (the author of "Duende," "Andalus" and "Guerra") and Chris Stewart (the author of "Driving Over Lemons") being contemporary.

As of 1966 the book was still being reprinted.

In 1855 Richard Ford also wrote "Andalucia, Ronda and Granada, Murcia, Valencia, and Catalonia; the portions best suited for the invalid." (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)
Condition / Notes: This is a stated fourth edition of this landmark travel guide.

This antique set is bound in faded blind-stamped red cloth with stamped gilt lettering to the spines and front covers. The books show moderate external wear, with light soiling to the covers. The bindings are sound. A period signature appears at the top of the title pages. The pages display occasional light foxing. This work contains textual illustrations, a double-page map of Spain at the front of the first volume, a number of fold-out maps and a large folding map in a pocket at the rear of the first volume. This last map has very small tears at a number of the intersections of the folds. The text appears in double columns.
Lot 3006

$90

Title: Black Magic
Author: Paul Morand - Paul Morand was a French author whose short stories and novellas were lauded for their style, wit and descriptive power. His most productive literary period was the inter-war period of the 1920s and 1930s. He was much admired by the upper echelons of society and the artistic avant-garde who made him a cult favorite. He has been categorized as an early Modernist, and Imagist.

Morand was a graduate of the Paris Institute of Political Studies, preparing him for a diplomatic career, and also attended Oxford University.

A member of the upper class and married into wealth, he held various diplomatic posts and traveled widely. His was typical of those in his social group who enjoyed lives of privilege and entitlement, adhering to the inevitability and desirability of class distinction.

Morand espoused a reflexive adherence to racial, ethnic and anti-Semitic ideologies. His intellectual influences included the writing of Friedrich Nietzsche, Oswald Spengler, and the author of a treatise on the superiority of the white race, Joseph Arthur de Gobineau. During World War II, he pledged allegiance to the French Vichy regime, and became a government functionary, and Nazi collaborator. He served as Vichy ambassador in Romania and Switzerland during World War II.

He was a patron and inspirational figure for the Hussards literary movement, which opposed Existentialism.

Morand made four bids for admission to the prestigious Academie francaise and was finally accepted in 1968, over the protest of Charles de Gaulle. (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)
Translor: Hamish Miles
Publisher: The Viking Press
City: New York
Year: 1929
Printing Information: First US Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: vi/218 pages
Width: 6" Height: 8.5"
Book Details: This is a translation of the 1928 French novel "Magie noire." It focuses on Morand's travels in Sub-Saharan Africa and his encounters with African cultures, which he admires. The book was published in English in 1929, translated by Hamish Miles and with illustrations by Aaron Douglas


The book was reviewed in The Outlook by Lucille Fort Hewlings who compared it to André Gide's Travels in the Congo, which was published in English around the same time. Hewlings wrote: "If two Frenchmen had not happened to publish books about the negro at the same time, no one would have been so hard-hearted as to have subjected the work of Paul Morand (discussed below) to the ordeal of comparison with that of André Gide. But it happens that nothing could illustrate better than do these two books the difference between the attitude toward the negro of the versatile, up-to-the-minute but neither before nor after it journalistic mind (Morand) and the philosophical, highly cultured mind (Gide). Both men are negrophiles. But Morand is the raucous emotional follower of the Harlem cult; Gide, the intelligent critic of primitive culture, the temperate admirer of primitive virtues." Hewlings continued: "Black Magic will be interesting to readers of Bruno Frank's brilliant The Persians Are Coming, for Morand presents in Congo an example of the African out of America whose primitive appeal to anemic Europe is breaking down its civilization. This theory is further upheld by the drawings of Aaron Douglas when he gives us those pale shadowy figures dancing before a symbolic background. Pale arms raised in supplication to an African god that magnetizes decadent Europe after the scourge of war. Aaron Douglas knows his own people and his drawings are in sharp contrast to the deliberate violence of Morand's prose." (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)
Condition / Notes: This antique volume is bound in quarter black cloth and black paper-covered boards with a stylized golden stars & clouds pattern. The spine has a gold paper label with black lettering. The book shows light shelfwear. The binding is firm. The interior is clean and without markings. This work contains plates with illustrations by Harlem Renaissance artist Aaron Douglas. The intact illustrated. dust jacket, with price of $5.00 on the front flap, displays small tears along the top edge and at the foot of the spine.

This book is from the library of Leroy Truman Goble, a minor figure in the Chicago literary renaissance of the 1920's. Goble was friendly with the likes of Sherwood Anderson and Ben Hecht. He was also a photographer and artist, although he seems to have worked in the fledgling advertising in Chicago during that time.
Lot 3007

$40

Title: A Popular Account of the Ancient Egyptians
Author: Sir John Gardner Wilkinson - Sir John Gardner Wilkinson was an English traveller, writer and pioneer Egyptologist of the 19th century. He is often referred to as "the Father of British Egyptology".

Wilkinson was born in Little Missenden, Buckinghamshire. His father was a Westmoreland clergyman, the Reverend John Wilkinson, an amateur enthusiast for antiquities. Wilkinson inherited a modest income from his early-deceased parents. Sent by his guardian to Harrow School in 1813, he later went up to Exeter College, Oxford in 1816. Wilkinson ultimately took no degree and, suffering from ill-health, decided to travel to Italy. There in 1819 he met the antiquarian Sir William Gell and resolved to study Egyptology.

Wilkinson first arrived in Egypt in October 1821 as a young man of 24 years, remaining in the country for a further 12 years continuously. During his stay, Wilkinson visited virtually every known ancient Egyptian site, skillfully recording inscriptions and paintings as a talented copyist and compiling copious notes.

Finally returning to England for his health's sake in 1833, succeeding in being elected to the Royal Society in 1834, Wilkinson went on to publish his researches in a large number of publications. Although preceded by "The Topography of Thebes and General View of Egypt" in 1835, Wilkinson's most significant work was "Manners and Customs of the Ancient Egyptians." First published in three volumes in 1837 and subsequently illustrated by Joseph Bonomi, this title stood as the best general treatment of ancient Egyptian culture and history for the next half century. Acclaim for this publication brought Wilkinson a knighthood in 1839 and ensured him the title of the first distinguished British Egyptologist.

The now Sir John Gardner Wilkinson returned to Egypt in 1842, contributing an article entitled "Survey of the Valley of the Natron Lakes" to the Journal of the Geographical Society in 1843. The same year witnessed his publication of a revised and enlarged edition of his "Topography," entitled "Moslem Egypt and Thebes."

Wilkinson travelled in Dalmatia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina during 1844, an account of his observations being published in 1848 ("Dalmatia and Montenegro," 2 volumes).

A third visit to Egypt in 1848 to 1849 was followed by a final visit to Thebes in 1855. Thereafter, Wilkinson remained in England where he investigated Cornish antiquities and studied zoology.

Wilkinson died at Llandovery in 1875, having already bequeathed to his old school, Harrow, his collections with an elaborate catalogue in 1864.

Wilkinson's papers are now held in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and form an invaluable resource to some of the earliest recorded states (dating to 1821 to 1856, before the advent of widespread tourism and collection) of many Egyptian monuments. Many sites were subsequently damaged or lost altogether, making Wilkinson's work all the more important.
Publisher: Harper & Brothers, Publishers
City: New York
Year: 1854
Binding Style: Hardcover
Number of Volumes: 2 Full Set: Yes
Width: 5.5" Height: 8"
Book Details:
Condition / Notes: This antique set is bound in blind-stamped dark brown cloth, with stamped gilt lettering to the spines. The book shows moderate external wear, with white staining to the spine edges of the first volume. The binding is firm. The pages exhibit occasional light foxing. This work is profusely illustrated, including a well-preserved fold-out map at the front of the second volume, a frontispiece in the first volume, full-page and textual illustrations.
Lot 3008

$70

Details: This lot includes the antique ornithological lithograph shown in the corresponding image(s). This work, drawn by renowned ornithologist and bird artist John Gould, is a hand-colored lithograph by H. C. Richter, printed by Hullmandel and Walton. It offers attractive, vivid images of an Asian songbird known as the rufous-vented tit (Parus rubidiventris). These two small birds are depicted perched on a branch hanging in mid air.


To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: This piece, measuring approximately 14.5" x 21.5", is preserved in a window mat, with the upper edge of the lithograph taped to the verso of the top edge of the mat. The right edge of this print is saw-toothed with binding stitching still attached. The lower half of the image area exhibits very faint toning. The print and the mat are otherwise well preserved.
Lot 3009

$80

Title: U.S. Infantry & Rifle Tactics: U.S. Infantry Tactics, for the Instruction, Exercise, and Manoeuvres of the United States Infantry, Including Infantry of the Line, Light Infantry and Riflemen: Containing the School of the Soldier, the School of the Company, Instruction for Skirmishers, the General Calls, the Calls for Skirmishers, and the School of the Battalion : Including the Articles of War and a Dictionary of Military Terms
Author: United States War Department
Publisher: J. B. Lippincott & Co.
City: Philadelphia
Year: 1863
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 450 pages plus 14 pages of advertisements, and 70 leaves of plates (some folded)
Width: 4" Height: 5.5"
Book Details:
Condition / Notes: This antique volume is bound in blind-stamped pebbled dark green cloth. The stamped gilt lettering to the spine is faded. The book shows external wear, with light soiling to the covers and minor loss of material at the outside corners of the boards and the bottom/top edge of the spine. The binding is sound. This volume lacks all preliminary pages preceding the notice before the preface. Light pencil appear on the front pastedown and the bottom margin of the notice. Annotations in pencil can also be seen on the rear endpaper. The pages exhibit occasional light foxing.
Lot 3010

$110

Title: Baghdad & Points East
Author: Robert J. Casey - Robert Joseph Casey was a decorated combat veteran and distinguished Chicago-based newspaper correspondent and columnist.

Casey was born March 14, 1890, in Beresford, South Dakota, and attended St. Mary's College in St. Marys, Kansas from 1907 to 1911. Casey enlisted in the Army in 1918 and served at Verdun and Meuse-Argonne as an artilleryman. He earned three citations for bravery in combat before his discharge as a captain in 1919. Casey later wrote (anonymously) "The Cannoneers Have Hairy Ears: A Diary of the Front Lines" about his wartime experiences, and this book was acclaimed for its gritty and realistic depictions of an American soldier in World War I.

In 1920, Casey joined the Chicago Daily News, where he worked as a columnist and foreign correspondent for twenty-seven years. Casey wrote features, chronicled the Chicago gang wars of the era, and compiled "slice of life" stories, which were published in the paper under column titles "Vest Pocket Anthology," "Such Interesting People," and "More Interesting People."

During the 1920s and 1930s, Casey traveled through Indochina, Cuba, Pitcairn Islands and Easter Island, and many other sites, and wrote about his adventures in newspaper columns and books. In 1940, Casey covered the blitz in London and its aftermath; he was also in Hawaii and the Pacific right after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December, 1941.

After his coverage of World War II in France, Africa, and the Pacific, Casey came back to Chicago to write. He had been married to Marie Driscoll, who died in 1945; in 1946 Casey married Hazel MacDonald, a reporter and fellow Chicago-based foreign correspondent he first met in 1933. After Casey's retirement from the Daily News in 1947, he continued to write books and freelance newspaper articles. In 1955, he was named Press Veteran of the Year by the Chicago Press Veterans Association. (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)
Publisher: J. H. Sears & Company. Inc, Publishers
City: New York
Year: 1928
Printing Information: Signed Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: xi/300 pages
Width: 6.75" Height: 9.75"
Book Details:
Condition / Notes: This is a scarce author-signed first edition of this early work of the country of Iraq. The inscription on the front flyleaf reads "To Roy Goble / (and may Allah give / us more like him) who / somehow gets about to the / bookshops and makes the / days brighter for his old / friend. / Robert (Ahmed) Casey / Nov. 8 - 1928 / Baghdad by Goose Island."

This antique volume is bound in black cloth with stamped gilt lettering to the spine and front cover. The front cover has a pictorial design stamped in gold depicting an ancient monument with a gilt circle. The book shows moderate external wear, with fading of spine lettering. The binding is firm. The pages are clean and without markings. This work is illustrated with numerous photographic plates offering views of sites around Iraq.

This book is from the library of Leroy Truman Goble, a minor figure in the Chicago literary renaissance of the 1920's. Goble was friendly with the likes of Sherwood Anderson and Ben Hecht. He was also a photographer and artist, although he seems to have worked in the fledgling advertising in Chicago during that time.
Lot 3011

$20

Title: M. T. Ciceronis De Officis Libri Tres ex Editionibus Oliveti et Ernesti. Accedunt Notae Anglicae
Author: Cicero - Marcus Tullius Cicero (sometimes anglicized as Tully) was a Roman philosopher, statesman, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the equestrian order, and is widely considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists.
His influence on the Latin language was so immense that the subsequent history of prose in not only Latin but European languages up to the 19th century was said to be either a reaction against or a return to his style. According to Michael Grant, "the influence of Cicero upon the history of European literature and ideas greatly exceeds that of any other prose writer in any language." Cicero introduced the Romans to the chief schools of Greek philosophy and created a Latin philosophical vocabulary (with neologisms such as humanitas, qualitas, quantitas, and essentia) distinguishing himself as a linguist, translator, and philosopher.
Petrarch's rediscovery of Cicero's letters is often credited for initiating the 14th-century Renaissance. According to Polish historian Tadeusz Zieli?ski, "Renaissance was above all things a revival of Cicero, and only after him and through him of the rest of Classical antiquity." The peak of Cicero's authority and prestige came during the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, and his impact on leading Enlightenment thinkers such as John Locke, David Hume, and Montesquieu was substantial. His works rank among the most influential in European culture, and today still constitute one of the most important bodies of primary material for the writing and revision of Roman history, especially the last days of the Roman Republic.

Though he was an accomplished orator and successful lawyer, Cicero believed his political career was his most important achievement. It was during his consulship that the Second Catilinarian Conspiracy attempted the government overthrow through an attack on the city from outside forces, and Cicero suppressed the revolt by executing five conspirators without due process. During the chaotic latter half of the 1st century BC marked by civil wars and the dictatorship of Gaius Julius Caesar, Cicero championed a return to the traditional republican government. Following Julius Caesar's death Cicero became an enemy of Mark Antony in the ensuing power struggle, attacking him in a series of speeches. He was proscribed as an enemy of the state by the Second Triumvirate and subsequently murdered in 43 BC.

Translor: Charles Knapp Dillaway
Publisher: Perkins & Marvin
City: Boston
Year: 1837
Printing Information: First Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 297 pages plus 2 pages of advertisements
Width: 4.25" Height: 6.5"
Book Details: "In this edition of Cicero's treatise "De Officiis" the generally received text of Oliveti and Ernesti has been adopted.
It has been a leading object to present it to our young students in as accurate a form as possible, no alteration being made except in adapting the orthography to that of the dictionaries and grammars generally used in this country, and distinguishing by accents certain equivocal words.
The notes are intended to throw light upon such passages in the text as require illustration, and, in accordance with the good custom which now prevails, have been placed at the end of the volume. Remarks of a philological character, which commentators have bestowed, with an excess of liberality, upon the works of this author, it has been thought expedient to omit." (From author's preface)
Condition / Notes: This antique volume is bound in pebbled dark brown cloth, with a printed paper label to the spine. The book shows moderate external wear, with light soiling to the covers. The binding is firm. The pages display sporadic light foxing. The final two leaves have creased upper right corners. The text is in Latin, the notes are in English.
Lot 3012

$10

Book Details: This lot consists of the Antique Forbes Business Library Volumes shown in the corresponding images.

These uniformly bound books on finance were published before the stock market crash of 1929. Subject include fundamentals of business, selling, and profits.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend out live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities.
Lot 3013

$100

Title: Jumbee and Other Uncanny Tales
Author: Henry S. Whitefield - Henry St. Clair Whitehead was an American writer of horror fiction and fantasy.



Henry S. Whitehead was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, on March 5, 1882, and graduated from Harvard University in 1904 (in the same class as Franklin D. Roosevelt). He led an active and worldly life in the first decade of the 20th century, playing football at Harvard, editing a Reform democratic newspaper in Port Chester, New York, and serving as commissioner of athletics for the AAU.



He later attended Berkeley Divinity School in Middletown, Connecticut, and was ordained a deacon in the Episcopal Church in 1912. From 1918 to 1919 he was Pastor of the Children, Church of St. Mary the Virgin, New York City. He served as acting archdeacon of the Virgin Islands from 1921 to 1929. While there, living on the island of St. Croix, Whitehead gathered the material he was to use in his tales of the supernatural. A correspondent of H. P. Lovecraft, Whitehead published stories from 1924 onward in Adventure, Black Mask, Strange Tales, and especially Weird Tales; in his introduction to Jumbee, R. H. Barlow would later describe Whitehead as a member of "the serious Weird Tales school.". Whitehead's supernatural fiction was partially modelled on the work of Edward Lucas White and William Hope Hodgson. Whitehead's "The Great Circle" (1932) is a lost-race tale with sword and sorcery elements.



In later life, Whitehead lived in Dunedin, Florida, as rector of the Church of the Good Shepherd and a leader of a boys group there. Barlow collected many of his letters, planning to publish a volume of them; but this never appeared, although Barlow did contribute the introduction to Whitehead's "Jumbee and Other Uncanny Tales" (1944). H. P. Lovecraft was a particular friend of Whitehead's, visiting him at his Dunedin home for several weeks in 1931. Lovecraft said of him: "He has nothing of the musty cleric about him; but dresses in sports clothes, swears like a he-man on occasion, and is an utter stranger to bigotry or priggishness of any sort."



Lovecraft expressed admiration for Whitehead's work, described his story "The Passing of a God" as "perhaps representing the peak of his creative genius." Stefan Dziemianowicz describes Whitehead's West Indian tales as "virtually unmatched for the vividness with which they convey the awe and mystery of their exotic locale".(Courtesy of Wikipedia)

Publisher: Arkham House
City: Sauk City, Wisconsin
Year: 1944
Printing Information: First Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: xii/394 pages
Width: 5.75" Height: 7.75"
Book Details: The stories for this volume were taken chiefly from the magazines Weird Tales and Adventure.
Condition / Notes: This collection of fantasy and horror short stories has an introduction is by Whitehead's fellow Floridian Robert H. Barlow. 1,559 copies were printed.


This volume is bound in dark blue cloth with stamped gilt lettering to its spine. Book is in excellent condition. The intact illustrated dust jacket, with price of $3.00 on front flap, displays shelfwear, with sunning to spine and small tears at the top edge.
Lot 3014

$45

Details: This lot includes the hand-colored 19th-century map of the Southern Cone shown in the corresponding image(s). Entitled "Map of the United Provinces of La Plata, the Banda Oriental, & Chile," this work, derived from the manuscript by Woodbine Parish, chargé d'affaires at Buenos Aires from 1825 to 1832, was published by John Arrowsmith in 1834. This detailed map has bright color outlines and shows what today are central and northern areas of Argentina and Chile, including each nation's capital, the countries of Uruguay and Paraguay, and portions of Bolivia and Brazil.


John Arrowsmith (1790–1873) was an English geographer (mapmaker) and member of the Arrowsmith family of geographers. He was born at Winston, County Durham.

In 1810 he joined his uncle Aaron Arrowsmith in his mapmaking business in London. In 1821, they published a map of North America using a combination of a maps obtained from the Hudson's Bay Company and Aaron's own previous work. After his uncle died in 1823, the business was carried on by his sons Aaron and Samuel Arrowsmith until 1839 when John Arrowsmith took over the business. In 1834 John published his "London Atlas," which were the best set of such maps then in existence. He followed the atlas with a long series of elaborate and carefully executed maps, those of Australia, America, Africa and India being especially valuable. In 1863 he received the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society, of which body he was one of the founders.

His maps were very numerous, and their neatness and finished style gained John a very extensive reputation. Arrowsmith was also a most industrious collector of materials. (biographical information courtesy of Wikipedia)


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Condition / Notes: This map, measuring approximately 20" x 25", displays faint water markings, light soiling and minor spotting. The upper left corner has a closed tear, with taping to the verso. Taping is also visible at the right and left edges of the verso of the central fold. The map displays no punctures.
Lot 3015

$10

Book Details: This lot consists of the bound compilations of "Littell's Living Age" shown in the corresponding images.

Included are volumes XLI through L of the fifth series, covering January of 1883 to June of 1885. Each title is bound in half-leather with a marbled paper cover and marbled ends, and features gilt lettering on the spine.

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Condition / Notes: These items show well with signs of age/wear which may include chipping to the cover and/or spine as well as fading to gilt lettering and marbling.
Lot 3016

$30

Details: This lot consists of the vintage Americana advertising illustration and design shown in the corresponding images.

Included are concept sketches, illustrations, advertisements, and other work mostly from the studio of twentieth-century illustrator/designer Harry Kane. Kane was born Harry Kirchner in 1912 to Russian-Jewish immigrant parents in Philadelphia. He began his career as a commercial artist during the Great Depression, when he relocated to New York City and sold his first illustrations to Street and Smith Publications. In addition to freelance advertisements for such corporations as Philip Morris, Schlitz Beer, and Seagram's, Kane contributed illustrations to a variety of pulp magazines and books, including "Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators". During World War II, he was drafted and stationed in Hawaii as a mapmaker for the army. After the end of the war, he continued taking freelance assignments until the 1980s. He passed away in 1988.

Included is a greeting card to Kane signed by MGM film producer Sol Siegel, with a photo taken by the same. Also present is a sketch of a financial advertisement by Kane accompanied by black mounting paper, on which Kane has signed his name in silver ink.

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Condition / Notes: Many of these items are drafts and concept art not intended for public viewing, and thus feature many pencil markings and damage to paper and boards as the artist's process mandated. The full-color illustration of the family is protected by plastic. Kane's signature is visible in silver ink underneath one of the sketches.
Lot 3017

$80

Book Details: This lot consists of the history and genealogy of Maine books shown in the corresponding images.

Titles include "Old Kittery and Her Families" by Evertt S. Stackpole, "History of Wells & Kennebunk, Maine", and "History of Cumberland County, Maine". Other texts include historical information on Vassalborough, Searsport, and Yarmouth.

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Condition / Notes: These items show very well with few signs of age/wear. "Old Kittery and Her Families" features an original dust jacket, as does "Ancient North Yarmouth and Yarmouth, Maine". Other titles feature illustrated covers and/or gilt lettering on the spine.
Lot 3018

$45

Details: This lot consists of the Antique Postcards & Album shown in the corresponding images.

Decorative features include Embossed and chromolithograph cards. Included are items with religious iconography, architecture, sports stadiums, landscapes, and floral imagery. Holiday greetings are also included.

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Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated ta the extremities. This may include edge wear or chipping. Most colors remain bright. Album is unfilled.
Lot 3019

$90

Details: This lot consists of the Antique Stereoviews shown in the corresponding images.

These include images throughout New York City and New York State including Central Park and Saratoga Springs. Other pictures depict Bridges, Railroads, Waterfalls, Waterways, and Architecture.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities. This may include some toning or light foxing.
Lot 3020

$200

Details: This lot includes the group of documents from the Second World War and post-war period shown in the corresponding image(s). This collection contains a work permit issued by the General Government of German-occupied Poland ("Arbeitskarte fur Arbeitskrafte aus dem Generalgouvernement Polen und Bescheinigung"), with Nazi stamps, typed-in details and finger prints of the bearer, a birth certificate, dated March 17, 1942, issued by the parish office of a village in Galicia, handwritten in German and certifying the newborn to be a Ukrainian of Aryan descent. Other documents are from the time (immediately) following the war, such as a certificate issued by the Ukrainian Red Cross in Geneva, control cards for immigration into Australia, a marriage certificate for Georg Jalowizkyj and Anna Grygus, an international certificate of inoculation and vaccination, and papers provided by the International Refugee Organization. Also present are a number of handwritten documents from the thirties and beginning of the century, relating to various individuals and families, with stamps of government entities in Venezuela, Czechoslovakia, Austria/Austro-Hungary, with a number of family trees relating to the Janis (?) family


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Condition / Notes: These items display some age/wear indications. The items from the war period show greater wear, with light soiling, tearing along folds and minor loss at the edges.
Lot 3021

$25

Book Details: This lot consists of the decorative antique literature shown in the corresponding images.

Included are a complete seven-volume set of Shakespeare's works, as well as a decorative edition of Dickens' "Bleak House". There is also a half-leather bound Italian-language edition of Goldoni's comedies.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.

Condition / Notes: These items show well with some signs of age/wear, including chipping/soiling to covers and spines. Gilt lettering and designs are well-preserved.
Lot 3022

$100

Details: This lot consists of the Antique Estate Ephemera shown in the corresponding images.

These items include correspondence, billheads, bank receipts, financial related ephemera, telegraphs, and insurance brochures. The billhead of the "Calumet Malting Company" has a chromolithograph illustration of a Native American Indian with peace pipe.

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Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications.
Lot 3023

$55

Book Details: This lot consists of the books relating to Scottish Immigration to America shown in the corresponding images.

Many of these items have decorative gilt lettering to spine and cover. "The Original Scots Colonists, 1612-1783" and "Scottish-American Heirs 1683-1883" by David Dobson are in dust jackets.

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Condition / Notes: These items are well preserved.
Lot 3024

$20

Book Details: This lot consists of the Collectible Literature shown in the corresponding images.

Included are vintage and antique volumes. "A Room of One's Own" by Virginia Woolf is an early printing (1929). "The Alcestiad or, A Life In The Sun" by Thornton Wilder is signed by his sister Isabel, the author of the Foreword. "Never Cry Wolf" by Farley Mowat is a First American Edition (1963). "The Longest Day June 6, 1944" by Cornelius Ryan is a First Printing (1959).

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Condition / Notes: These items generally show well with some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities. Many of these books are in dust jackets or decorative covers.
Lot 3025

$60

Book Details: This lot consists of the history and genealogy of the state of Maine books shown in the corresponding images.

Titles include "Old Times: North Yarmouth, Maine 1877-1884" by Augustus W. Corliss, "Early Families of Standish, Maine" by Albert J. Sears, and volumes I through VI of "Penobscot Pioneers" by Philip Howard Gray. Other texts include further history and baptism records of the region.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.

Condition / Notes: These items show very well with little to no signs of age/wear. "Old Times" features a well-preserved dust jacket, and "Penobscot Pioneers" and several other volumes feature decorative/illustrated covers.
Lot 3026

$50

Details: This lot consists of the Antique Ornithological Plates shown in the corresponding images.

These original plates include chromolithographs and hind-tinted images of a large varieties of species. Individual images and bio-diverse scenes are included. They include images of Birds of Prey, Tropical Birds and Water Fowl.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities. This may include edge/wear or loss to border. Colors remain bright.
Lot 3027

$40

Details: This lot consists of the Vintage and Antique Automotive Ephemera shown in the corresponding images.

These items include Work Licenses, Permits, and payment receipts. Also included are advertisements, catalogs, booklets, postcards and a calendar card for companies such as Ford Dodge, Chevrolet, Concord, and Ouachita.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities.
Lot 3028

$30

Book Details: This lot consists of the Antique Estate Books shown in the corresponding images.

Items include a First Edition of "The Mystery Of Muller Hill" (Gleaner Press, 1899), and the classic tales "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland", and Gulliver's Travels". Theatrical scripts include "Dixieland Minstrels" by Arthur L. Kaser, "Comin' 'Round The Mountain" by Ned Albert, items published by The Dramatic Publishing Company and Samuel French.

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Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications. Wrappers for plays are intact. Back cover of first edition detached.
Lot 3029

$70

Title: Marching Men
Author: Sherwood Anderson - Sherwood Anderson was an American novelist and short story writer. His most enduring work is the short story sequence "Winesburg, Ohio." Writers he has influenced include Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, John Steinbeck, and Thomas Wolfe. It was Anderson's influence which saw both Faulkner and Hemingway first published.
Publisher: John Lane Company
City: New York
Year: 1917
Printing Information: Signed Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 314 pages
Width: 5.5" Height: 7.75"
Book Details:
Condition / Notes: This is a scarce author-signed first edition. The inscription on the front flyleaf reads "7/1/19 / Leroy Goble / In recognition of / his talent at / sabotage on the / bourgoisie (sic) / Sherwood Anderson."

This antique volume is bound in maroon cloth with stamped gilt lettering to the spine and front cover. The book shows external wear, with darkening to the spine, faded spine lettering, and very light soiling to the covers. The binding is firm. The bookplate of Leroy Goble appears on the front pastedown, with a book dealer's sticker (A. Kroch & Co., booksellers, Chicago) in the bottom right corner. The pages are clean and without markings.

This book is from the library of Leroy Truman Goble, a minor figure in the Chicago literary renaissance of the 1920's. Goble was friendly with the likes of Sherwood Anderson and Ben Hecht. He was also a photographer and artist, although he seems to have worked in the fledgling advertising in Chicago during that time.
Lot 3030

$60

Book Details: This lot consists of the genealogical history of New England books shown in the corresponding images.

Notable titles include "The Chadbourne Family in America: A Genealogy" and "The Hearls, Earls, Earles of Northern New England and the Descendants of William Hearl of 1655". A four-volume "Index of Persons" from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register is also included.

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Condition / Notes: These items show very well with few signs of age/wear. "Genealogical Research in New England" features its original, well-preserved dust jacket.
Lot 3031

$150

Title: A Thousand and One Afternoons in Chicago
Author: Ben Hecht - Ben Hecht was an American screenwriter, director, producer, playwright, journalist and novelist. He received screen credits, alone or in collaboration, for the stories or screenplays of some seventy films. He wrote thirty-five books and created some of the most entertaining screenplays and plays in America. "The Dictionary of Literary Biography - American Screenwriters" calls him "one of the most successful screenwriters in the history of motion pictures." At the age of 16, Hecht ran away to Chicago, where in his own words he "haunted streets, whorehouses, police stations, courtrooms, theater stages, jails, saloons, slums, madhouses, fires, murders, riots, banquet halls, and bookshops." In the 1910s and early 20s, Hecht became a noted journalist, foreign correspondent, and literary figure.

A prolific writer, Hecht received the first Academy Award for Original Screenplay, for "Underworld" (1927). Many of the screenplays he worked on are now considered classics. He also provided story ideas for such films as "Stagecoach" (1939). Film historian Richard Corliss called him "the Hollywood screenwriter," someone who "personified Hollywood itself." In 1940, he wrote, produced, and directed, "Angels Over Broadway," which was nominated for Best Screenplay. In total, six of his movie screenplays were nominated for Academy Awards, with two winning.

He became an active Zionist shortly before the Holocaust began in Germany, and wrote articles and plays about the plight of European Jews, such as, "We Will Never Die" in 1943 and "A Flag is Born" in 1946. Of his seventy to ninety screenplays, he wrote many anonymously to avoid the British boycott of his work in the late 1940s and early 1950s. The boycott was a response to Hecht's active support of paramilitary action against British forces in Palestine and sabotaging British property there, during which time a supply ship to Palestine was named the S. S. Ben Hecht.

According to his autobiography, he never spent more than eight weeks on a script. In 1983, 19 years after his death, Ben Hecht was posthumously inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame. (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)

Publisher: Covici-McGee
City: Chicago
Year: 1922
Printing Information: Signed Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 288 pages
Width: 6.25" Height: 8.75"
Book Details: ""One Thousand and One Afternoons" were launched in June, 1921. They were presented to the public as journalism extraordinary; journalism that invaded the realm of literature, where in large part, journalism really dwells. They went out backed by confidence in the genius of Ben Hecht. This, if you please, took place three months before the publication of "Erik Dorn," when not a few critics "discovered" Hecht. It is not too much to say that the first full release of Hecht's literary powers was in "One Thousand and One Afternoons." The sketches themselves reveal his creative delight in them; they ring with the happiness of a spirit at last free to tell what it feels; they teem with thought and impressions long treasured; they are a recital of songs echoing the voices of Ben's own city and performed with a virtuosity granted to him alone. They announced to a Chicago audience which only half understood them the arrival of a prodigy whose precise significance is still unmeasured." (From Henry Justin Smith's preface)
Condition / Notes: This is a scarce author-signed first edition of this collection of sketches on life in Chicago which originally appeared in a Daily News column. The inscription on a blank preliminary page reads "To Leroy Goble / A dear, wholesome / volume of little / value for purposes of / seduction -- and to be / read as a non- / aphrodisiac -- / Ben Hecht."

This antique volume is bound in a multi-color illustrated paper-covered boards, with pictorial designs to the front and rear cover depicting an imaginary Chicago skyline dotted with advertisements that present the title and author of this work. The black spine has yellow lettering. The book shows external wear, with light soiling to the covers and loss of material at the head of the spine. The binding is firm. This volume has a black top edge and pictorial endpapers with a representation of rows of windows of an apartment building. The pages are clean and without markings. This work is lavishly illustrated with a double-page illustration as a title page, full-page illustrations and vignettes, a large number of which appear at the fore edges. The design of the book and the illustrations are by a Dutch-born American artist Herman Rosse.


This book is from the library of Leroy Truman Goble, a minor figure in the Chicago literary renaissance of the 1920's. Goble was friendly with the likes of Sherwood Anderson and Ben Hecht. He was also a photographer and artist, although he seems to have mainly worked in the fledgling advertising in Chicago during that time.
Lot 3032

$35

Book Details: This lot includes the group of antique and vintage Moody's manuals shown in the corresponding image(s). The titles in this collection are as follows:

"Moody's Manual of Investments, American and Foreign: Railroad Securities" (Moody's Investor Service, 1930)

"Moody's Railroads, Section 2" (in spiral binder, 1938/1939)

"Moody's Manual of Investments, American and Foreign: Industrial Securities" (Moody's Investors Service, 1948, ex-library).

These books contains a great wealth of information, including a large number of statistical tables, and, in the case of the 1930 railroad title, a number of well-preserved fold-out maps of railroad lines.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.

Condition / Notes: The books show moderate external wear, , with light soiling and occasional rubbing to covers and/or fraying to the edges of the volumes. The bindings are sound. The interiors are clean and without markings.
Lot 3033

$25

Book Details: This lot consists of the Collectible Antique Literature shown in the corresponding images.

"Lavengro The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest" by George Borrow is a First Edition (1914), with tipped-in color plates. "Fetch Over the Canoe A Story of a Song" by William Lightfoot Visscher (1908), and "The Blood of the Fathers" by G. Frank Lydston ((1912) are signed First Editions. "The Ginger Cure" by William Ganson Rose is also author-signed, and "Just Stories" by John M. Stahl contains laid in author-signed correspondence on a decorative Billhead. Most of these author-signed volumes are inscribed to Leroy Goble.

Leroy Truman Goble was a minor figure in the Chicago literary renaissance of the 1920s, and was friendly with the likes of Sherwood Anderson and Ben Hecht. He was also a photographer and artist, although he seems to have worked in the fledgling advertising business in Chicago during that time.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities. Some of these volumes are in dust jackets.
Lot 3034

$225

Details: This lot consists of the vintage advertising and literary illustration and design shown in the corresponding images.

Included are three concept drawing by twentieth-century illustrator/designer Harry Kane. Kane was born Harry Kirchner in 1912 to Russian-Jewish immigrant parents in Philadelphia. He began his career as a commercial artist during the Great Depression, when he relocated to New York City and sold his first illustrations to Street and Smith Publications. In addition to freelance advertisements for such corporations as Philip Morris, Schlitz Beer, and Seagram's, Kane contributed illustrations to a variety of pulp magazines and books, including "Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators". During World War II, he was drafted and stationed in Hawaii as a mapmaker for the army. After the end of the war, he continued taking freelance assignments until the 1980s. He passed away in 1988.

These three pieces are signed by Kane under his birth name, "Kirchner", including a draft of the cover design for "The Great Meadow" by Elizabeth Madox Roberts. Each piece is on sturdy artist's paper and features many pencil notes and other markings by the artist.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.

Condition / Notes: These items are drafts and concept art not intended for public viewing, and thus feature many markings to the paper as the artist's process mandated. All three are signed by Harry Kane under his birth name of Kirchner.
Lot 3035

$10

Title: The Cassowary: What Chanced in the Cleft Mountains
Author: Stanley Waterloo - Stanley Waterloo was an American newspaperman, editor, newspaper owner, and author of both non-fiction and fiction. He was born in St. Clair County, Michigan in 1846 and died in Chicago, Illinois in 1913 (of pneumonia). He married Anna Charlotte Kitton on February 11, 1874. Waterloo attended the University of Michigan. One source says he graduated in 1869, but another says he did not. Waterloo secured an appointment to West Point, but was not able to attend, because he suffered an injury. One account was that he had been kicked by a horse he was trying to break. Having grown up in the countryside, Waterloo was fond of the outdoors and was highly regarded for his descriptions of nature. He was, among other things, a Game Warden for Illinois.

By 1870 Waterloo was in Chicago, where he went to study law but dropped out and instead began his career in journalism. In 1871, after the Great Chicago Fire, he moved to St. Louis, Missouri, and acquired a proprietorship interest in the Evening Journal. For the next dozen years he worked in Missouri at, variously, the Missouri Republican, the St. Louis Chronicle, and the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. While Waterloo was editor of the Chronicle, an editorial appeared which was critical of a local judge. The judge threatened Waterloo and there were concerns that the threat included physical violence. Waterloo refused to back down. It turned out that the editorial was actually written by another judge. He then moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he began a newspaper named The Day. He then moved back to Chicago and worked in an editorial capacity at the Chicago Tribune. This occupied the next half dozen years, and during this time he was twice president of the Chicago Press Club. He then turned exclusively to literature.

His first novel, "A Man and a Woman," sold more than 100,000 copies in six months. His work was well received in England, and he was one of the first American authors to sell well there. His most famous work, "The Story of Ab: A Tale of the Time of the Caveman," was followed by a story by Jack London, "Before Adam," which was so similar to Waterloo's novel that Waterloo accused London of plagiarism. London denied this, explaining that his story was in the nature of a commentary on Waterloo's work. (Information courtesy of Wikipedia)
Publisher: Monarch Book Company
City: Chicago
Year: 1906
Printing Information: Signed Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 402 pages
Width: 5.5" Height: 7.75"
Book Details:
Condition / Notes: This is a scarce author-signed first edition of this novel. The inscription on the half title page reads "To Leroy T. Goble, with / the earnest regard of / Stanley Waterloo. / Chicago, July 22, 1911."

This antique volume is bound in full leather, with loss of almost all of the spine cover and minor loss at the edges of the boards. The binding has been reinforced. An antique bookplate appears on the front pastedown. The pages are clean and without markings. This work is illustrated with a number of plates.

This book is from the library of Leroy Truman Goble, a minor figure in the Chicago literary renaissance of the 1920's. Goble was friendly with the likes of Sherwood Anderson and Ben Hecht. He was also a photographer and artist, although he seems to have worked in the fledgling advertising in Chicago during that time.
Lot 3036

$50

Book Details: This lot includes the group of antique military history books shown in the corresponding image(s). This collection contains a first edition of a handsomely bound "Dedication of Monuments Erected by the State of Iowa: Commemorating the Death, Suffering and Valor of Her Soldiers on the Battlefields of Vicksburg, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Shiloh, and in the Confederate Prison at Andersonville" (Emory H. English, State Printer, 1908), a first edition of Charles F. Manderson's "The Twin Seven-Shooters" (F. Tennyson Neely, 1902), a first edtion of "Old Fort Snelling, 1819-1858" (The State Historical Society of Iowa, 1918) by Marcus L. Hansen, a limited edition of "The Field Diary of Lt. Edward Settle Godfrey, Commanding Co. K., 7th Cavalry Regiment under Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer in the Sioux Encounter at the Battle of the Little Big Horn" (The Champoeg Press, 1957, 1 of 1000), and a first edition of Ella Wheeler Wilcox' "Custer and Other Poems" (W. B. Conkey Company, 1896).


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Condition / Notes: These books may display some age/wear indications. We identify any advanced flaws that come to our attention during cataloguing.
Lot 3037

$25

Details: This lot consists of the Antique Chromolithograph Paper Dolls shown in the corresponding images.

Included are five dolls of different sizes, with a variety of outfits for each. These period costumes include accessories such as hats and muffs.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities. Some dolls or costumes show loss which may include ends of hands or feet/shoes. Colors remain bright.
Lot 3038

$55

Book Details: This lot consists of the Decorative Antique History shown in the corresponding images.

"At Grips with Everest" by Stanley Snaith (1938), is a First Edition in dust jacket. Other volumes discuss Pirates and Natural Disasters.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items exhibit some age/wear indications concentrated at the extremities.
Lot 3039

$80

Book Details: This lot consists of the Genealogical History of Massachusetts shown in the corresponding images.

Cities and Towns represented include Manchester, Rowley, Newbury, Charlestown, Dennis, Barrington and Provincetown. Subjects include Settlement Records, Vital Records, Cemetery Inscriptions, and Genealogy.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items are well preserved.
Lot 3040

$275

Details: This lot consists of the Amazing Stories "Bed Sheet" pulp magazines shown in the corresponding images.

Amazing Stories is an American science fiction magazine launched in April 1926 by Hugo Gernsback's Experimenter Publishing. It was the first magazine devoted solely to science fiction. Before Amazing, science fiction stories had made regular appearances in other magazines, including some published by Gernsback, but Amazing helped define and launch a new genre of pulp fiction (information courtesy Wikipedia).

These issues are all in "bed sheet" size and run from November 1926 (the first year of publication) to November 1932 and feature stories by H.G. Wells, Jules Verne, Harl Vincent, and A. Hyatt Verrill.

To inspect and acquire more detailed information about this lot, please attend our live preview before the auction.
Condition / Notes: These items feature intact covers and some signs of age/wear. Each issue is individually bagged.
Lot 3041

$90

Title: The Custer Semi-Centennial Ceremonies, 1876 - June 25-26 - 1926
Author: A. B. Ostrander, E. S. Godfrey, M. E. Hawkins, R. S. Ellison
Publisher: The Casper Printing and Stationery Co.
City: Casper, Wyoming
Year: 1926
Printing Information: First Edition
Binding Style: Perfect Binding
Pagination: 48 pages
Width: 6.25" Height: 9.5"
Book Details: This compilation contains the following texts:
"The Custer Semi-Centennial" by Major A.B. Ostrander; "Hasty Notes on the Semi-Centennial" by R.S. Ellison; "The Official Report" by General E.S. Godfrey; "The Burial of the Hatchet" by M.E. Hawkins.
Condition / Notes: This antique volume is bound in its original printed wrappers. The booklet shows light shelfwear. The binding is firm. The interior is clean and bright. This work contains numerous textual illustrations, offering photos of Custer, army veterans and Native Americans. A slip of paper attached to the verso of the front cover reads as follows: "Please acknowledge receipt with comments A. B. Ostrander, 2271/2 Belmont Ave. No., Seattle, Wash."
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